While following the situation in Ukraine, this picture particular caught my eye as a vexillologist. I have been looking for images of the Donetsk oblast flag in action, being one of the most loved flags. And indeed, it looks nice, though I would guess the material to be a bit
The blue flag in the right of it is the flag of Slovyansk, a city in the oblast where some of the notable events in the Ukraine debacle took place

While following the situation in Ukraine, this picture particular caught my eye as a vexillologist. I have been looking for images of the Donetsk oblast flag in action, being one of the most loved flags. And indeed, it looks nice, though I would guess the material to be a bit

The blue flag in the right of it is the flag of Slovyansk, a city in the oblast where some of the notable events in the Ukraine debacle took place

Flag of Kineshma, Ivanovo oblast
We’re back to our favourite oblast with their penchant for minimalistic, absurd flags. This time in the form of two rolls of paper towels? Wait no, they’re actually bundles of cloth, for some reason. Dunno, the flag description isn’t even helpful. Something about bargaining or trade. Well, it’s not like the Shuya flag’s symbolism made any sense either.

Flag of Kineshma, Ivanovo oblast

We’re back to our favourite oblast with their penchant for minimalistic, absurd flags. This time in the form of two rolls of paper towels?¬†Wait no, they’re actually bundles of cloth, for some reason. Dunno, the flag description isn’t even helpful. Something about bargaining or trade. Well, it’s not like the Shuya flag’s symbolism made any sense either.

Out of Russia: Flag of the Crimean Tatars
Tatars are an interesting bunch. Mongol Muslims inhibiting Eastern Europe. The most well known variation are probably the ones from Tatarstan in the Russian federation, but Tatars also have their own installment in Poland/Lithuania (Lipka Tatars), various regions in Siberia, and of course, Ukraine in the form of Crimean Tatars.
This flag is a flag for the peoples rather then the region of Crimea (which has their own flag). It has a long history associated with the Crimean Khanate which existed since the Middle Ages before eventually annexed by the Russian empire, and fell into the hands of the USSR.
Freshly off the Ukrainian conflict news you would hear more about the Crimea region being more pro-Russia, but in general, Crimean Tatars don’t have the same sentiment, perhaps due to the fact that Stalin during his reign expelled many Crimean Tatars to Siberia although post-USSR dissolution, many of them came back, and Crimean Tatars nowadays make up around 12% of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea.

Out of Russia: Flag of the Crimean Tatars

Tatars are an interesting bunch. Mongol Muslims inhibiting Eastern Europe. The most well known variation are probably the ones from Tatarstan in the Russian federation, but Tatars also have their own installment in Poland/Lithuania (Lipka Tatars), various regions in Siberia, and of course, Ukraine in the form of Crimean Tatars.

This flag is a flag for the peoples rather then the region of Crimea (which has their own flag). It has a long history associated with the Crimean Khanate which existed since the Middle Ages before eventually annexed by the Russian empire, and fell into the hands of the USSR.

Freshly off the Ukrainian conflict news you would hear more about the Crimea region being more pro-Russia, but in general, Crimean Tatars don’t have the same sentiment, perhaps due to the fact that Stalin during his reign expelled many Crimean Tatars to Siberia although post-USSR dissolution, many of them came back, and Crimean Tatars nowadays make up around 12% of the Autonomous Republic of Crimea.

Flag of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria
Well, if you’re into contemporary Russia, you’re probably already familiar with the hot mess that is Chechnya. I won’t go too much into the politics of it because it’s a complicated and sensitive topic, but historically, this flag was used by the breakaway government of the Republic of Chechnya after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, throughout the Chechen wars. While officially Chechnya is a republic under the Russian Federation, pro-secessionist Chechens prefer to use this flag instead of the official Republic of Chechnya flag, which keeps the colour scheme. 

Flag of the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria

Well, if you’re into contemporary Russia, you’re probably already familiar with the hot mess that is Chechnya. I won’t go too much into the politics of it because it’s a complicated and sensitive topic, but historically, this flag was used by the breakaway government of the Republic of Chechnya after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, throughout the Chechen wars. While officially Chechnya is a republic under the Russian Federation, pro-secessionist Chechens prefer to use this flag instead of the official Republic of Chechnya flag, which keeps the colour scheme.¬†

Flag of Irkutsk, Irkutsk oblast
Irkutsk the city, sometimes regarded as the capital of Siberia has a very unorthodox approach to designing their flag. The black sabre with a dead carcass on its mouth is already featured in the oblast’s flag, so that’s one question down, but one must wonder what is up with this pseudo 3D perspective? It creates and illusion of a room but everything else just seems misplaced This flag is just overll a bundle of confusion

Flag of Irkutsk, Irkutsk oblast

Irkutsk the city, sometimes regarded as the capital of Siberia has a very unorthodox approach to designing their flag. The black sabre with a dead carcass on its mouth is already featured in the oblast’s flag, so that’s one question down, but one must wonder what is up with this pseudo 3D perspective? It creates and illusion of a room but everything else just seems misplaced This flag is just overll a bundle of confusion

Flag of North Caucasian Emirate (1920-1921)
Today the areas of the emirate belongs to the Russian caucasus republic, namely Dagestan and Chechnya. It’s common knowledge that the star and crescent along with the colour green are typical Islamic elements in flag, and the North Caucasian Emirate chose to arrange it in a quite, um, interesting way. Well, they end up using this flag for merely a year anyway.

Flag of North Caucasian Emirate (1920-1921)

Today the areas of the emirate belongs to the Russian caucasus republic, namely Dagestan and Chechnya. It’s common knowledge that the star and crescent along with the colour green are typical Islamic elements in flag, and the North Caucasian Emirate chose to arrange it in a quite, um, interesting way. Well, they end up using this flag for merely a year anyway.